Faculty

Grant to Support Humanities Scholar's New Novel on Black Cult Leader

Mitchell S. Jackson photo by John Ricard

Asst. Prof. Mitchell S. Jackson is accustomed to pushing the boundaries of artistic creation, both writing and teaching fiction and non-fiction. Now, the University of Chicago scholar has been recognized with a prestigious award—one that will help support a new work of historical fiction.

Jackson recently received a 2021 Creative Capital Grant, which will provide him with up to $50,000 in direct funding as well as additional long-term career development services from a community of diverse artists. Specifically, this grant will fund his project, John of Watts, which is inspired by the rise and fall of the Black cult leader Eldridge Broussard Jr.

How Alternate Reality Games Are Changing the Real World with Patrick Jagoda and Kristen Schlit

Patrick Jagoda

Video games are the most popular form of media. With 2.5 gamers, games are set to be the type of media that most defines our world. Prof. Patrick Jagoda (English Language and Literature) and Kristen Schlit (Sociology) are re-thinking how to leverage Alternate Reality Games in a way to address some of the world's biggest issues, ranging from climate change to public health.

Aught Culture: The Exhibitions That Defined the 2000s

Smart Museum Exhibition: Between Past and Future: New Photography and Video from China

The illuminating exhibition “Between Past and Future: New Photography and Video from China,” co-organized by University of Chicago professor Wu Hung and International Center of Photography curator Christopher Phillips (a former senior editor at A.i.A.), the survey comprised 130 works by sixty Chinese artists. It debuted at the International Center of Photography and the Asia Society, both in New York, and toured to six other museums in the United States and abroad, including the Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago. The vision it delivered was that of a nation utterly transformed both physically and socially. Photographs by Zhang Dali and Sze Tsung Leong showed historic neighborhoods reduced to rubble to make way for soaring modern towers; Rong Rong and Xing Danwen documented the renegade life of their artist friends in the squalor of Beijing’s self-styled East Village; Liu Zheng turned his lens on everyone from professional village mourners to convicts to decadent businessmen; Wang Qingsong staged elaborate scenes melding Chinese history and folklore with contemporary life.

UChicago Humanities Scholars Expand Digital Dictionaries of South Asia, Middle East

Gary Tubb, left, and James Nye with some of the South Asian language dictionaries in Nye's home

For decades, scholars at the University of Chicago have sought to preserve and share the languages of South Asia and the Middle East—from Assamese to Torwali, Khowar to Pashto.

In this work, the Digital Dictionaries of South Asia are invaluable: In addition to definitions and pronunciations, users can learn about the original source of words in languages spoken by nearly a quarter of the world’s population.

Prof. Gary A. Tubb and James Nye, a former UChicago Library bibliographer, are now spearheading a major expansion of these digital dictionaries—a three-year project that will help scholars, diplomats, journalists, businesspeople and countless others.

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