Alumni

UChicago Alum Tim Cassedy Receives the MLA First Book Award

Tim Cassedy

Tim Cassedy (AM’05) is fascinated with the role language played at the turn of the 19th century, and how language served to identify and differentiate people. For his cultural study of early America, Figures of Speech: Six Histories of Language and Identity in the Age of Revolution (University of Iowa Press, 2019), Cassedy recently received the Modern Language Association’s annual First Book Award, which recognizes his contribution to linguistics, the history of the book, and the cultural history of British imperialism.

UChicago Fellow Adam Singerman Receives the SSILA's Mary R. Haas Award for His Groundbreaking Dissertation

Adam Singerman

Adam Singerman’s dream was to research and document an endangered language in Brazil. His journey began in 2012 when his admiration for the scholarship of UChicago Professor Lenore Grenoble drew him to the Department of Linguistics doctoral program. Grenoble’s studies of indigenous languages in Siberia have inspired his own quest.

Now his years of immersive fieldwork and scholarship for the indigenous Brazilian language of Tuparí have been recognized. Singerman’s 2018 dissertation “The Morphosyntax of Tuparí, a Tupían Language of the Brazilian Amazon,” recently received the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas’ Mary R. Haas Award for significant contribution to the world’s knowledge of Native American Languages.

Kimberly Peirce Reflects on How UChicago Shaped Her Filmmaking Career

Kimberly Peirce

When Kimberly Peirce made Boys Don’t Cry two decades ago, she created the movie as a labor of love. The University of Chicago alum wanted to tell the story of Brandon Teena, to honor the courage and imagination of a trans person who lost his life in pursuit of his true self. But the small, independent film became a surprise hit and cultural touchstone, one that established Peirce as a director and helped shape a national conversation about gender and sexual identity. None of that would have been possible without UChicago, Peirce insisted during a recent visit to campus.

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