A-J Aronstein, AM'10, Featured in 'Paris Review Daily'

It's a balmy 38 degrees today in Chicago, but an article by A-J Aronstein, AM'10, in the Paris Review Daily reminds us not to get too comfortable. Aronstein, an alumni of the Master of Arts Program in the Humanities (MAPH), meditates on how the unique cold of February in Chicago affects our bodies and brains, leading us from Lacan to Netflix and from selfish survival to the promise of OKCupid.

William Pope.L Profiled in 'Interview Magazine'

In the February 2013 issue of InterviewWilliam Pope.L, Associate Professor in Visual Arts, discussed his upcoming exhibition at the Renaissance Society and his "crawl" pieces. The most famous of these "crawl" works consisted of crawling on his hands and knees from the beginning to the end of Broadway street in Manhattan, a 22-mile journey that took him nine years to complete, "with each installment lasting as long as Pope.L could endure the knee and elbow pain (often about six blocks)." He also considered questions surrounding whether he defines his work as activism, his upcoming Pull! project (in which he and a group of local participants will pull an eight-ton truck through the streets of Cleveland by hand), and his thoughts on authorship in community-based art.

The community is, in fact, one of the most important parts of Pope.L's work. When asked whether he enjoys making the work he does, he responded:

No, I did not enjoy crawling. Overall, I enjoy making work with others. I enjoy the small moments of revelation that are only possible in the company of others. I enjoy making a clear puzzle. I realize more and more that making is unmaking. To make something is to undo it. To make something is to make it less mysterious, that is, in the process of removing a veil, one of many. You gain more intimacy, but it may not be very pleasant.

Pope.L's show at the Renaissance Society, titled Forlesen, will run from April 28 to June 23. It will be his first solo exhibition in Chicago since joining the University faculty.

With Valentine's Day Approaching, Why Not Try an Ancient Greek Love Spell?

We live in an era of convenience, and trying to make someone fall in love with you using only your personality is time-consuming. It might be time to try a different kind of charm: ancient Greek magic! The Core spoke with Chris Faraone, Frank Curtis Springer and Gertrude Melcher Springer in Classics, about the kinds of love spells described in his book Ancient Greek Love Magic. Faraone explained that men and women typically used different kinds of spells, an eros spell for men and a philia spell for women. The eros spell was used as more of a curse, designed to cause the woman an unbearable amount of torture which could only be relieved by the man who cast the spell. The philia spell was designed to bind the man closer to the woman, and was related more to healing magic than to torture (which presumably comes in the later stages of the relationship).

Richard G. Stern, 1928-2013

Richard G. Stern, the Helen A. Regenstein Professor Emeritus in English, died January 24 at age 84. Stern joined the University of Chicago faculty in 1955 and wrote over twenty books of fiction and nonfiction in his lifetime. He was friends with many distinguished writers, including Saul Bellow, X'39, and Philip Roth, AM'55, who credits Stern for the idea to write his novella Goodbye, Columbus. During his time at the University, Stern received the Award of Merit from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. He was also a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Heartland Prize. The Paris Review describes him as "...a nurturing teacher and a powerful force in literature at the University of Chicago."

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