Visual Arts

Visual Arts Alumna to Publish Work on Cloistered Nuns

While researching Dedicated to God: An Oral History of Cloistered Nuns, Abbie Reese, MFA'13, spent six years learning and recording the individual stories of a community of cloistered monastic nuns living in a 25,000-square-foot enclosure outside Rockford, Illinois. Those stories and Reese's accompanying photographs will be published in November as part of the Oxford University Press's Oxford Oral History series, and mark one of the first times an author has been allowed access to an enclosure where nuns observe monastic silence. Reese graduated from the Department of Visual Arts in 2013, and has included photos and video from the project on her website. Her photos were also shown in the 2013 MFA Thesis exhibition, which can be found here.

UChicago Faculty Members Included in Newcity Art's "Art 50: Chicago's Artist's Artists"

Several faculty members of the Department of Visual Arts were featured on Newcity Art's list of "Chicago Artist's Artists." Newcity Art is devoted to coverage of visual arts in Chicago, and includes news, reviews, and features. Jessica Stockholder, Professor and Chair, was praised for the way that Chicago has featured in and informed her work, particularly with "Color Jam," her summer 2012 installation. Laura Letinsky, Professor, was noted for her innovative "constructions," which combine the notions of reproductions and originals, as well as William Pope.L, Associate Professor, for the ways he explores "the abject fantasies underpinning the absurdity of black male identity—and, by extension, all American identities."

Read the full profiles here.

Jessica Stockholder, Current Students, and Alumni Discuss Color at Logan Center

On February 8, Jessica Stockholder, Chair and Professor in Visual Arts, Jonathan Ullyot, PhD'10 and instructor in the College, and Nicholas Wong, a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature, and others gathered at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts to discuss the concept of color. This dialogue, presented by the Arts|Science Initiative, is part of The Cabinet, a monthly series seeking to explore multiple perspectives surrounding a particular theme, such as color, narrative, silence, and many more.

William Pope.L Profiled in 'Interview Magazine'

In the February 2013 issue of InterviewWilliam Pope.L, Associate Professor in Visual Arts, discussed his upcoming exhibition at the Renaissance Society and his "crawl" pieces. The most famous of these "crawl" works consisted of crawling on his hands and knees from the beginning to the end of Broadway street in Manhattan, a 22-mile journey that took him nine years to complete, "with each installment lasting as long as Pope.L could endure the knee and elbow pain (often about six blocks)." He also considered questions surrounding whether he defines his work as activism, his upcoming Pull! project (in which he and a group of local participants will pull an eight-ton truck through the streets of Cleveland by hand), and his thoughts on authorship in community-based art.

The community is, in fact, one of the most important parts of Pope.L's work. When asked whether he enjoys making the work he does, he responded:

No, I did not enjoy crawling. Overall, I enjoy making work with others. I enjoy the small moments of revelation that are only possible in the company of others. I enjoy making a clear puzzle. I realize more and more that making is unmaking. To make something is to undo it. To make something is to make it less mysterious, that is, in the process of removing a veil, one of many. You gain more intimacy, but it may not be very pleasant.

Pope.L's show at the Renaissance Society, titled Forlesen, will run from April 28 to June 23. It will be his first solo exhibition in Chicago since joining the University faculty.

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