Logan Center

Rebecca Zorach Curates Exhibit for 'AFRICOBRA in Chicago'

Rebecca Zorach, Professor in Art History, is curating an exhibition at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts as part of AFRICOBRA in Chicago, "a linked series of exhibitions and public programs scheduled May–September 2013 focusing on the Chicago artist group AFRICOBRA (African Commune Of Bad Relevant Artists), founded in 1968 and still active."

AFRICOBRA: Philosophy, curated by Zorach, will run from June 28 to August 11, 2013 at the Logan Center. According to the press release, the exhibit:

...is designed to highlight the aesthetic philosophy of AFRICOBRA first articulated in statements and exhibition text in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The exhibition in the Logan Center Gallery will demonstrate how the AFRICOBRA philosophy was collaboratively developed by the five founding members, through a presentation of key early works and selected current works, raising the question of how founding principles continue to inform each artist...Themes to be addressed include the revolutionary politics of the period, the project of bringing art to the people through a range of media, and the relationship of gender roles and family to the political context of the time.

Zorach is also assisting with the opening exhibition AFRICOBRA: Prologue at the South Side Community Art Center, which runs from May 10 to July 7, 2013 and is curated by University of Chicago students. The opening exhibition will provide historical background and contemporary context for the other exhibitions in the series.

AFRICOBRA in Chicago is a collaboration between The South Side Community Art Center, the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, and The DuSable Museum of African American History. A jointly-published website with detailed information about each of the events will launch later this month.

Jessica Stockholder, Current Students, and Alumni Discuss Color at Logan Center

On February 8, Jessica Stockholder, Chair and Professor in Visual Arts, Jonathan Ullyot, PhD'10 and instructor in the College, and Nicholas Wong, a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature, and others gathered at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts to discuss the concept of color. This dialogue, presented by the Arts|Science Initiative, is part of The Cabinet, a monthly series seeking to explore multiple perspectives surrounding a particular theme, such as color, narrative, silence, and many more.

Exhibit Honors Campus Veterans through Display of Original Work and Artifacts

A one-day exhibition of poetry, pictures, letters, and donated ephemera from campus veterans at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts on Monday, October 12, seeks to encourage discourse among the University community while honoring veterans for their service. When asked to share items that illustrated their experience serving in the armed forces, many veterans added schrapnel, uniforms, and empty cartridges to the exhibition. Josh Cannon, a third-year PhD student in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, assisted fellow veterans in submitting their stories to the exhibit by conducting story-telling workshops in the fall. “The stories are very eclectic,” Cannon said. “They are funny, happy and sad—they should display to the public the diverse ways that people experience their life in the military.”

Associate Provost Aneesah Ali, who organized the exhibition and a luncheon for the vets, explains, “This is the first time that we’re inviting the broader University community to recognize the veterans on campus. The long-term hope of outreach events like this is to attract more talented veterans to join our community.” The exhibition will be in the main lobby of the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts and will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For the full article, click here. To read more about campus veterans and their work in the Division of the Humanities, click here.

President Zimmer Discusses the Arts on Campus in the 'Wall Street Journal'

University of Chicago President Robert Zimmer recently discussed the ongoing integration of artistic practice and theory on campus in the Wall Street Journal, citing examples such as the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts and the Richard and Mary L. Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry to illustrate the "rich environment" available both to students and surrounding neighborhoods. "We have a great research university sitting in the middle of a great city," he explained. "Arts are a natural place where a university can contribute to and benefit from the city."