UChicago Scholar Mitchell S. Jackson Wins Pulitzer Prize for Essay on Ahmaud Arbery

Mitchell S. Jackson photo by John Card

Asst. Prof. Mitchell S. Jackson of the University of Chicago was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing for his essay in Runner’s World about the life and death of Ahmaud Arbery.

Arbery, an unarmed 25-year-old Black man, was shot and killed in February 2020 while jogging in Georgia after being chased by white men in vehicles. Arrests were made only weeks after the killing, once video pertaining to the incident was shared widely on social media.

Two Humanities Scholars Receive the Glenn and Claire Swogger Award for Exemplary Classroom Teaching

Rachel DeWoskin (first on the left) and Jessica Kirzane (far right) received the Swoon Awards.

Navneet Bhasin, Rachel DeWoskin, Jessica Kirzane and Lucas Pinheiro have been awarded the Glenn and Claire Swogger Award for Exemplary Classroom Teaching.

Based upon nominations from University of Chicago undergraduates, the award recognizes outstanding teachers with College appointments who introduce students to habits of scholarly thinking, inquiry and engagement in the Core Curriculum, the College’s general education program.

The Hidden History of 'Guerrilla Television': UChicago Scholars Preserve Decades-Old Videos

Eleanor Boyer (left) and Karen Peugh shoot some video footage. Photo is courtesy of Eleanor Boyer.

Decades before cellphone video changed how we create and consume media, the advent of low-cost, portable video cameras did something similar for underrepresented communities across the United States—allowing them to experiment with new forms of documentary, art and activism.

Known as “guerrilla television,” this movement of the late 1960s to 1970s helped amplify the voices of groups such as women, Black, Indigenous and people of color, immigrants and Appalachian miners.

Now, a consortium of University of Chicago scholars, librarians, and partnering archivists and filmmakers will create the Guerrilla Television Network—preserving and presenting the history of guerrilla television to a much wider audience. Supported by a grant of nearly $500,000 from the Council on Library and Information Resources, the three-year project will digitize 1,015 videotapes produced from 1967 to 1979.

UChicago Announces 2021 Winners of Quantrell and Graduate Teaching Awards

University of Chicago campus

The classroom has long been the foundation of a transformative University of Chicago education. This past year, however, students have found inspiration even without traditional classroom settings—guided by faculty who have navigated unusual circumstances with empathy, curiosity and a spirit of collaboration.

The University annually recognizes faculty for exceptional teaching and mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students through the Llewellyn John and Harriet Manchester Quantrell Awards, believed to be the nation’s oldest prize for undergraduate teaching; and the Faculty Awards for Excellence in Graduate Teaching and Mentoring, which honor faculty for their work with graduate students. In the Division of the Humanities, Prof. Patrick Jagoda will receive the Quantrell Award, and Assoc. Prof. Persis Berlekamp and Prof. Daniel Morgan will be recognized with the Faculty Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching and Mentoring.

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