News

Game Changer Chicago Awarded $1 Million MacArthur Foundation Grant

 Patrick Jagoda with Game Changer Chicago participants
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation has awarded $1 million over two years to the Game Changer Chicago Design Lab (GCC Design Lab), co-directed by associate professor of English Patrick Jagoda, to advance its work developing game-based learning experiences that promote sexual and reproductive health, academic success, civic engagement, and overall well-being among urban youth.

Exhibition Shows How Christians, Muslims, Jews Created Vibrant Society in Medieval Cairo

Photo credit: Anna Ressman
A new exhibition at the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute Museum will offer a glimpse into everyday life in a lively, multicultural city in ancient Egypt. “A Cosmopolitan City: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Old Cairo” features many objects that have never been displayed in the museum before and shows how people of different faiths interacted to create a vibrant society. The exhibition is on view from Tuesday, Feb. 17 through Sept. 13.

Linguists Tackle Computational Analysis of Grammar

Children don’t have to be told that “cat” and “cats” are variants of the same word—they pick it up just by listening. To a computer, though, they’re as different as, well, cats and dogs. Yet it’s computers that are assumed to be superior in detecting patterns and rules, not 4-year olds. John Goldsmith and Jackson Lee are trying to solve that puzzle or at least provide the tools to do so.

Graduate Student Kate Pukinskis Premieres Composition

This edited version originally appeared in UChicago News on 26 February.

Kate Pukinskis loves to sing in choirs, to be on stage with others enveloped by the “crazy, loud sounds” of Beethoven’s Ninth or Verdi’s Requiem. “Choral music comes very naturally to me,” said Pukinskis, a doctoral student in composition in the Department of Music who has sung in professional choirs since she was a child.

“There is great joy in making music with other people—and it’s such a cool thing to use your voice as your instrument and feel it resonate inside your body.”

Pukinskis enjoys crafting that experience for others as she has done with her latest work, Water on the Thirsty Land: Three Songs from the Book of Isaiah, a set of choral pieces for unaccompanied choir that premiered February 28 at Rockefeller Memorial Chapel, as part of the Quire & Place concert series.

Entitled Sacred Powers of Water, the concert explored water themes and features commentary by Christopher Neill, director of the Ecosystems Center at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass., where the concert will be repeated later this year.

Pukinskis chose three excerpts from Isaiah that use water as metaphors for the divine—as protector, life giver, and strengthener. She realizes them musically, creating moments where words and sounds invoke the comfort of being enveloped in a pool, or the relief that comes when one’s thirst is quenched. She draws inspiration from her carefree childhood in New England, roaming through woods and swimming in ponds. “I remember playing in the water and how insulating that felt,” she said. “Anyone can relate to that protective feeling.”

Steven Rings on the Many Voices of Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan is the ultimate musical shape-shifter. In his five-decade career, he has refused to stay in the same place for long, moving fluidly between genres, voices and performance styles. To some, that elusive quality makes Dylan almost maddening. To others, it makes him fascinating. But to musicologist Steven Rings, it makes Dylan's work a perfect object of scholarly analysis.

American Culture From Every Angle

Asking Eric Posner about President Obama's use of executive discretion. A conversation with Rosanna Warren on poetry as history. Hearing Alison Winter explain the unusual source materials she discovered while studying memory. Any one of these conversations could be the highlight of a graduate-level course. For students to have multiple opportunities—one every week for a quarter—is an extraordinary circumstance, but it happens in the graduate seminar that is a signature project for the Karla Scherer Center for the Study of American Culture.

MLA Honors Steinberg for Work on Dante

Justin Steinberg highlighted the previously unexamined legal aspects of Dante’s 14th-century masterpiece in Dante and the Limits of Law, published by the University of Chicago Press. On Dec. 3, the Modern Language Association awarded the book the 22nd Howard R. Marrarro Prize. The prize will be presented at the MLA’s annual conference in Vancouver in January.