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UChicago Professor Wins 2018 Lewis Lockwood Award

Seth Brodsky

Music scholar Seth Brodsky takes the momentous fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 as an opportunity to re-evaluate modernism through psychoanalysis and music in his first book, From 1989, or European Music and the Modernist Unconscious (University of California Press, 2017), which received the Lewis Lockwood Award from the American Musicological Society for 2018. Every year the Lewis Lockwood Award honors a musicological book of exceptional merit published during the previous year by scholars in the early stages of their careers. “In studying and analyzing the events of the remarkable year 1989, Seth offers a wholly new and exciting way of thinking about modern music,” said Anne Walters Robertson, Dean of the Division of the Humanities.

Prominent Harvard Law Professor Publishes New Book Condemning the Compromises at the Core of American Civic Life

Lawrence Lessig

The first Division of the Humanities Berlin Family Lecturer Lawrence Lessig just published America, Compromised, capturing his sweeping, well-documented indictment of U.S. institutions, politicians, and citizens. Published by UChicago Press, the Harvard Law School professor’s new book expands on his lectures, providing a detailed look of why America is on the wrong path. According to Lessig, change is still possible if the American people can acknowledge and reverse its direction.

UChicago Professor Martha Nussbaum Wins $1 Million Berggruen Prize

Martha Nussbaum is the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor at UChicago.

The UChicago philosopher and professor Martha Nussbaum will receive the 2018 Berggruen Prize, which is given once a year and carries a cash award of $1 million to a thinker whose ideas “have profoundly shaped human self-understanding and advancement in a rapidly changing world.” She is the author or editor of more than 40 wide-ranging books covering topics such as the place of emotions in political life, the nature of human vulnerability, the importance of liberal education, and the connections between classical literature and the contemporary world.

UChicago Professor Wins 2018 Kirkus Prize for Fiction

Ling Ma receives wide recognition for her apocalyptic novel, "Severance." Photo by Anjali Pinto.

Imagination, personal experience, and lucid prose complement the in-depth research and stealthy dose of satire in Severance, Ling Ma’s debut novel, which just received the 2018 Kirkus Prize for fiction. Expanded from what originally began as a short story, her book was selected from 1,193 books published during the past year. Each winning author of the Kirkus Prize receives $50,000 and widespread renown in the book publishing world.

Philosophy Professor Gabriel Richardson Lear to Deliver Aims of Education Address

Gabriel Richardson Lear

Gabriel Richardson Lear, professor in the Department of Philosophy, the Committee on Social Thought, and the College, will deliver the Aims of Education address to incoming UChicago students on Sept. 27 at 6:30 p.m. in Rockefeller Memorial Chapel. During this celebrated UChicago tradition, she will talk about wonder and how it helps us to understand the world and ourselves.
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Edward Wasiolek, renowned scholar of Russian literature, 1924–2018

Edward Wasiolek, 1924-2018

In his 40-plus-year career at the University of Chicago, Edward Wasiolek became a renowned scholar of Slavic and comparative literature, and particularly of Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoevsky.

Wasiolek edited five volumes devoted to the notebooks for Dostoevsky’s novels, translated and edited volumes on Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, and wrote the widely acclaimed Dostoevsky: The Major Fiction (1964). He also wrote Tolstoy’s Major Fiction (1978) and gave a distinguished presentation on Tolstoy to the United Nations in 1988.

Wasiolek, who passed away on May 3 at age 92, taught from 1955 to 1996 at UChicago, where he was the Avalon Foundation Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Comparative Literature, and the College. He also served as the chair of the Comparative Literature Program and of the Department Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Heralded Composer and UChicago Colleagues Launch New Concert Series

Inaugural Season of the Chicago Center for Contemporary Composition

Award-winning UChicago composer Augusta Read Thomas is championing the inaugural session of the Chicago Center for Contemporary Composition. She sees the opening season for these concerts as the start that advances beyond the UChicago campus. For example, one of Center’s featured musicians in the the Grossman Ensemble “could be ambassadors for the university and the city and the composers, and themselves,” says Thomas, University Professor of Composition in the Music Department of the Division of the Humanities.
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