Faculty Awards, Publications, and Creative Endeavors

Faculty Awards, Publications, and Creative Endeavors

This list includes the major awards, publications, and creative endeavors of the Division of the Humanities faculty members during the 2017–2018 academic year (July 1, 2017, to June 30, 2018). All faculty members are listed with their rank and title as of June 30, 2018.

ART HISTORY

Niall Atkinson, Associate Professor in Art History, received the Faculty Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching and Mentoring at the 2018 University of Chicago Convocation. He also served as a curator at the Venice Architecture Biennial. Through the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, Atkinson received a Russ H. Kress Fellowship to support a residency at Villa I Tatti in 2017–2018.

Persis Berlekamp, Associate Professor in Art History, received a research grant from the European Research Council.

Patrick Crowley, Assistant Professor in Art History, received a research grant from UChicago’s Stevanovich Institute for the Formation of Knowledge to investigate the historical reciprocity between modes of making and knowing.

Seth Estrin, Assistant Professor in Art History, co-chaired and organized a panel at the Archaeological Institute of America’s annual meeting in Boston.

Chelsea Foxwell, Associate Professor in Art History, received a Fulbright Research Fellowship to support a research leave and residency at the University of Tokyo.

Matthew Jesse Jackson, Associate Professor in Art History and Visual Arts, received a research leave fellowship at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, where he was named the Beinecke Fellow. He participated in the exhibitions at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa in Cape Town, South Africa; the Center for Contemporary Art in Lagos, Nigeria; the Gund Gallery at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio; Pitzer College Art Galleries in Claremont, California; and the Critical Distance Centre for Curators in Toronto, Canada. He delivered a presentation “Theaster Gates and Everything-ism” at the Nasher Sculpture Prize event in Dallas.

Aden Kumler, Associate Professor in Art History, was appointed the inaugural coeditor, with Beate Fricke, at the University of Bern, for the Viewpoints book series, which is a joint initiative of the International Center of Medieval Art and the Cloisters Collection at the New York Metropolitan Museum.

Wei-Cheng Lin, Associate Professor in Art History, received a project grant for “Zhihuasi in Beijing” from the UChicago Center in Beijing. He also served as the co-curator of the exhibition “Sites and Images: Two Research Projects of Oxford University and the University of Chicago” in Beijing.

Christine Mehring, Professor and Chair in Art History, received programming, research, and exhibition grants from the Mellon Foundation, Getty Foundation, and Terra Foundation for American Art, as well as UChicago’s France Chicago Center, and Franke Institute for the Humanities. She delivered the keynote presentation at the 40th Anniversary Conference of International Dada Archive at the University of Iowa.

Richard Neer, the William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor in Art History and Cinema and Media Studies, organized a conference at the University of Chicago titled “Fragile, Ephemeral, Mutable: Archaeologies of Almost Nothing.”

Megan Sullivan, Assistant Professor in Art History, received a research leave fellowship from UChicago’s Franke Institute for the Humanities.

Wu Hung, the Harrie A. Vanderstappen Distinguished Service Professor in Art History, published Space in Art History (Shanghai Renmin chubanshe, 2018), On Chinese Art: Cases and Concepts, vol. 2 (Art Media Resources, 2018), and Histories of Photography in China (Zhongguo minzu shying chubanshe, 2017). He received the College Art Association Distinguished Scholar award, and his book Ancient Chinese Art in a Global Context was honored with “China’s Best Books of 2017 Award.”

CINEMA AND MEDIA STUDIES

Alison Nadia Field, Associate Professor in Cinema and Media Studies, received several grants: an Inclusive Pedagogy Grant from the University of Chicago; a Faculty Grant from UChicago’s Center for Race, Politics, and Culture; and a National Endowment for the Humanities Grant for a three-week institute at the Newberry Library on “Art and Public Culture in Chicago.”  

Judy Hoffman, Professor of Practice in Cinema and Media Studies, delivered a presentation on “Documentary Theory and Practice: Competing Tensions,” a screening of “70 Acres in Chicago: Cabrini Green,” and taught a master class, all at the University of Vermont.

Daniel R. Morgan, Associate Professor and Chair in Cinema and Media Studies, organized a conference at the University of Chicago titled “All the World’s Montage: From Cine-Eye to Cinemetrics” in honor of his colleague Yuri Tsivian.

D. N. Rodowick, the Glen A. Lloyd Distinguished Service Professor in Cinema and Media Studies, co-organized “The Public Sphere and Common Sense—A Symposium on Hannah Arendt” in Paris through collaboration with the Center for Advanced Film Studies at the Free University of Berlin. His work was part of an exhibition for the screening of “Plato’s Phaedrus” at the Institut National d’Histoire in Paris and at Lancaster University in Lancaster, UK.

Salomé Aguilera Skvirsky, Assistant Professor in Cinema and Media Studies, received a research leave fellowship from UChicago’s Franke Institute for the Humanities.

Jacqueline Stewart, Professor in Cinema and Media Studies, was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Jennifer Wild, Associate Professor in Cinema and Media Studies, collaborated with Jacqueline Stewart to curate the film series “Intimités: Everyday Life in Contemporary Afro/French Cinema” at Harper Theater in Hyde Park, which was supported by a grant from UChicago’s France Chicago Center. Wild also organized and participated in the event “50 Years Later: Remembering May ’68.”

CLASSICS

Michael I. Allen, Associate Professor in Classics, co-organized the “Handschriften and Papyri: Wege des Wissens” exhibition held in Vienna. He was recognized as the Directeur d’études associé by the Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme in Paris and was invited to address the Department of History at Université d’Angers in France.

Clifford Ando, the Daniel B. and Clare E. Stern Professor of Classics, History, and Law and Chair of Classics, delivered the Edmund G. Berry Lecture at the University of Manitoba and served as the Sackler Lecturer at the Mortimer and Raymond Sackler Institute of Advanced Studies at Tel Aviv University.

Shadi Bartsch-Zimmer, the Helen A. Regenstein Distinguished Service Professor in Classics and the Program in Gender Studies, published Cambridge Companion to the Age of Nero coedited with Kirk Freudenburg and Cedric Littlewood (Cambridge University Press, 2017). She received a grant from McLennan XCap to create a new capstone curriculum for fourth-year College students led by the Stevanovich Institute for the Formation of Knowledge.

Alain Bresson, the Robert O. Anderson Distinguished Service Professor in Classics and History, organized the Coin Circulation in the Ancient Greek World Mapping and Networks Conference at the University of Chicago Paris Center. He is also part of a three-year research project supported by a National Science Foundation grant for Computational Research Ecosystem for Scientific Collaboration on Ancient Topics, with colleagues David Schloen in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations and Walter Shandruk of UChicago’s Oriental Institute; his focus is on network analysis of archaic and classic Greek coin hoards. The team has devised a database for coins similar to scientific databases for cell formations, tracing the trade relationships between cities.

Christopher Faraone, the Frank and Gertrude Springer Professor in Classics, published The Transformation of Greek Amulets in Roman Imperial Times (Penn Press, 2018). He delivered the keynote lecture, “Women and Children First: The Earliest Evidence for Ancient Greek Body Amulets,” at the Australasian Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting at the University of Queensland.

Catherine Kearns, Assistant Professor in Classics, received grants from multiple institutions, including the Archaeological Institute of America, the Humanities Without Walls Consortium, and the Loeb Classical Library Foundation.

Michéle Lowrie, the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in Classics, delivered the Gray Lectures at the University of Cambridge.

Sarah Nooter, Associate Professor in Classics, published The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus (Cambridge University Press, 2017).

Mark Payne, Professor in Classics, published Hontology: Depressive Anthropology and the Shame of Life (Zero Books, 2018).

Sofia Torallas Tovar, Professor in Classics and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, received a research leave fellowship from the Loeb Classical Library Foundation and research grants from UChicago’s Neubauer Collegium, Franke Institute for the Humanities, and Paris Center.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

Leah Feldman, Assistant Professor in Comparative Literature, received a research leave fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies.

Haun Saussy, Professor in Comparative Literature and East Asian Languages and Civilizations, published Texts and Transformations: Essays in Honor of the 75th Birthday of Victor H. Mair (Cambria Press, 2018) and Translation as Citation: Zhuangzi Inside Out (Oxford University Press, 2017). He received the Modern Language Association’s Scaglione Prize for Comparative Literary Studies for his book The Ethnography of Rhythm: Orality and Its Technologies (Fordham University Press, 2016). Saussy also delivered the keynote address about “Master Zhuang’s Blue Guitar” at the sixth Asia-Pacific Forum on Translation and Intercultural Studies in Berkeley, California.

Olga Solovieva, Assistant Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Comparative Literature, published Christ’s Subversive Body: Practices of Religious Rhetoric in Culture and Politics (Northwestern University Press, 2017). She organized the “Japan’s Russia: Changing the East-West Paradigm” conference at the Franke Institute for the Humanities, which was supported by grants from the Japan Foundation of New York, as well as UChicago’s Franke Institute, Center for East Asian Studies, Stevanovich Institute for the Formation of Knowledge, and Neubauer Collegium.

EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CIVILIZATIONS

Michael K. Bourdaghs, the Robert S. Ingersoll Professor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, published Literature Among the Ruins: Postwar “Japanese” Literary Criticism (Lexington Books, 2018).

Kyeong-Hee Choi, Associate Professor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, received a grant for an introductory course on the study of gender and sexuality in contemporary East Asia from UChicago’s Center for East Asian Studies.

Paul Copp, Associate Professor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, co-organized a workshop at the University of Chicago, “The Material and Physical Circumstances of Chinese Religion in Acts and Objects,” with his colleague Donald Harper.

Donald Harper, the Centennial Professor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, published Books of Fate and Popular Culture in Early China: The Daybook Manuscripts of the Warring States, Qin, and Han (Brill, 2017).

Jieune Kim, Director of the Korean Language Program and Lecturer in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, received the Janel M. Mueller Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Paola Iovene, Associate Professor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, co-organized a workshop “Still Motion: Truth, Memory, and Image in East Asia” at the University of Chicago, supported by a grant from the U Chicago Center in Beijing.

Edward Louis Shaughnessy, the Lorraine J. and Herrlee G. Creel Distinguished Service Professor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, published An Overview of Western Sinologists’ Studies of Chinese Excavated Documents (Shanghai Guji Chubanshe, 2018). He received the Carl Friedrich von Siemens Fellowship from the Siemens Foundation to support a research leave and yearlong residency in Munich.

Judith Zeitlin, the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, delivered the keynote address, “Spirit Marriage and Phantom Heroines: From Chinese Literature to East Asian Media,” at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She received grants from UChicago’s Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry and Franke Institute for the Humanities, UChicago Arts, and Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Chicago.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Lauren Berlant, the George M. Pullman Distinguished Service Professor in English Language and Literature, was named the Visiting Distinguished Professor for the Program for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Johns Hopkins University. She was also elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Adrienne Brown, Associate Professor in English Language and Literature, published The Black Skyscraper (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017) and delivered the Annual Magliocco Lecture at Western Illinois University.

Bill Brown, the Karla Scherer Distinguished Service Professor in English Language and Literature, was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Timothy Campbell, Associate Professor in English Language and Literature, was shortlisted for the Kenshur Prize for the best book in any discipline of eighteenth-century studies for his book Historical Style: Fashion and the New Mode of History (Penn Press, 2016). He was the lead organizer for “Romantic Elements” at the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR) annual meeting to be held in Chicago in 2019 and co-organizer of the “Eighteenth-Century Seminar” at the Newberry Library.

Maud Ellmann, the Randy L. and Melvin R. Berlin Professor of the Development of the Novel in English in English Language and Literature, received a research leave fellowship from the National Humanities Center in North Carolina.

Frances Ferguson, the Ann L. and Lawrence B. Buttenwieser Professor in English Language and Literature, was named the Bain-Swiggett Visiting Professor at Princeton University.

Rachel Galvin, Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature, published News of War: Civilian Poetry 1936–1945 (Oxford University Press, 2018). She received a grant from the Center for Disciplinary Innovation to team teach a PhD seminar with her colleague Miguel Martinez.

Edgar Garcia, Neubauer Family Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature, received the Fence Modern Poets Series Award from Fence Books and a fellowship from the Institute for Critical Social Inquiry. He served as a consultant on a National Endowment for the Humanities grant for “Humanities Initiatives at Hispanics Serving Institutions” at Wright College.

Elaine Hadley, Professor in English Language and Literature, received a research leave fellowship from UChicago’s Franke Institute for the Humanities and two grants to explore diversity in curricula and teaching from the UChicago’s Office for Diversity and Inclusion.

Timothy Harrison, Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature, organized and led a seminar on “Shakespeare and Donne” at the Shakespeare Association of America in Los Angeles. He received two grants to fund preparation and teaching of a course about inventing consciousness, literature, philosophy, and psychology and to rehabilitate and relocate a printing press from UChicago’s Humanities Collegiate Division and Social Sciences Collegiate Division.

Patrick Jagoda, Associate Professor in English Language and Literature, received several grants to support Game Changer Chicago, devising games to engage young people in health and science. These include the National Institutes of Health Science Education Partner Award and Small Business Technology Transfer, and funding from the Humanities Without Walls Consortium. He also received a research leave fellowship from UChicago’s Franke Institute for the Humanities.

Ellen MacKay, Associate Professor in English Language and Literature, served as a senior scholar at the National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Teaching Institute at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Josephine McDonagh, Professor in English Language and Literature, published Commodities and Culture in the Colonial World (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017).

Benjamin Morgan, Associate Professor in English Language and Literature, received a residential research leave fellowship from the Stanford University Humanities Center.

John Muse, Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature, published Microdramas: Crucibles for Theater and Time (University of Michigan Press, 2017). He was also nominated to the Executive Committee of the American Society for Theater Research.

Sianne Ngai, Professor in English Language and Literature, delivered the keynote presentation, “Transparency and Enigma in the Gimmick as Capitalist Form,” at the Adorno Symposium at Indiana University.

Julie Orlemanski, Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature, served as the Chairperson of the James J. Paxson Memorial Travel Grants for Scholars of Limited Funds.

Benjamin Saltzman, Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature, received a research leave fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Zachary Samalin, Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature, received a research leave fellowship from UChicago’s Franke Institute for the Humanities and a grant from UChicago’s Stevanovich Institute for the Formation of Knowledge.

Jennifer Scappettone, Associate Professor in English Language and Literature, delivered keynote presentations at the Emergent Pedagogies Symposium at the Bard Masters of Arts in Teaching program in Los Angeles, at the Italian Poetry from Pasolini to Present Conference at Yale, and at the Transnational Beat Network Conference at the UChicago Center in Paris. She also received a grant from UChicago’s Franke Institute for the Humanities.

David Simon, Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature, published Light without Heat: The Observational Mood from Bacon to Milton (Cornell University Press, 2018).

Eric Slauter, Associate Profession in English Language and Literature, served as Director of UChicago’s Scherer Center for the Study of American Culture and on the Editorial Board for American Political Thought at the University of Chicago Press.

Christopher Taylor, Assistant Professor in English Language and Literature, published Empire of Neglect: The West Indies in the Wake of British Liberalism (Duke University Press, 2018).

Vu Tran, Assistant Professor of the Practice in the Arts and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Creative Writing and English Language and Literature, received a creative writer fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Kenneth W. Warren, the Fairfax M. Cone Distinguished Service Professor in English Language and Literature, delivered the keynote presentation at the Northwest Undergraduate Conference on Literature at the University of Portland.

John Wilkinson, Professor in English Language and Literature, served as a resident associate at the National Humanities Center.

GERMANIC STUDIES

Margareta Ingrid Christian, Assistant Professor in Germanic Studies, received a research leave fellowship from UChicago’s Franke Institute for the Humanities.

David J. Levin, the Addie Clark Harding Professor in Germanic Studies, served as coeditor for the new book series “Opera Lab” for the University of Chicago Press. He also received a Research Alumni Award from the Free University of Berlin.

Eric L. Santner, the Philip and Ida Romberg Professor and Chair in Germanic Studies, published Gesetz und Paranoia (August Verlag Berlin, 2018).

David E. Wellbery, the LeRoy T and Margaret Deffenbaugh Carlson University Professor in Germanic Studies, published Goethes, Pandora: Dramatisierung Einer Urgeschischte der Moderne (Bavarian Academy of Sciences, 2017). He also organized a joint graduate seminar at the University of Chicago in collaboration with Princeton and Columbia.

LINGUISTICS

Diane K. Brentari, the Mary K. Werkman Professor in Linguistics, coedited a book series on Chicago Studies in Linguistics for the University of Chicago Press. She received two grants on different aspects of sign language from the National Science Foundation.

Anastasia Giannakidou, Professor in Linguistics, is a board member for the book series Chicago Studies in Linguistics published by the University of Chicago Press. She was voted the best teacher at the LOT summer school in Linguistics at the University of Leiden, and UChicago’s Neubauer Collegium gave her a three-year grant to investigate the relation between dance and meaning.

John Goldsmith, the Edward Carson Waller Distinguished Service Professor in Linguistics, delivered the keynote presentation at the Annual Conference of African Linguistics at Michigan State University.

Lenore Grenoble, the John Matthew Manly Distinguished Service Professor in Linguistics, was named the Ken Hale Professor at the Institute of the Linguistic Society of America. She is documenting language contact and an individual without somatosensation through grants from the National Science Foundation and UChicago’s Neubauer Collegium.

Jason Merchant, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Lorna Puttkammer Straus Professor in Linguistics, co-organized a workshop on Greek linguistics at the University of Chicago. He also received a grant from UChicago’s Neubauer Collegium for a collaborative research project on historical semantics and legal interpretation.

Salikoko Mufwene, the Frank J. McLoraine Distinguished Service Professor in Linguistics, published a revised edition and translation of The Ecology of Language Evolution (The Commercial Press, 2017). He was inducted as a Linguistic Society of America Fellow based on his contributions to the discipline. Mufwene also delivered the keynote presentation at the International Conference of Historical Linguistics in San Antonio.

Ming Xiang, Associate Professor in Linguistics, received two grants from the National Science Foundation to study computational and psycholinguistic investigations, as well as identity and non-identity in anaphora resolution. Additionally, the UChicago Center in Beijing gave her a grant for a workshop on language diversity, contact, and change in China.

Alan Yu, Professor in Linguistics, was elected to the Executive Committee of the Linguistic Society of America. He received a grant from the Standing Committee on Language, Education, and Research to investigate Cantonese child directed speech and a grant from the National Science Foundation to examine the dynamics of sibilant convergence and change.

MUSIC

Jessica Baker, Assistant Professor in Music, served as the Chair for the Association of Black Ethnomusicologists. She also received a grant from UChicago’s Neubauer Collegium to study the contours of black citizenship in the global context.

Philip Bohlman, the Ludwig Rosenberger Distinguished Service Professor of Jewish History in Music, published Sounding Cities: Auditory Transformations in Berlin, Chicago, and Kolkata (LIT Verlag, 2018). He received the 2017 Ruth Solie Prize from the American Musicological Society for the outstanding collection of essays and the 2018 Koizumi Fumio Price for Ethnomusicology. He performed five times with the New Budapest Orpheum Society in locations ranging from Madison, Wisconsin, to Berlin, where he performed with Christine Wilkie Bohlman. Bohlman also received a research leave fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and an award for research in Germany from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

Anthony Cheung, Assistant Professor in Music, performed his compositions in cities worldwide, including Melbourne, Tokyo, Paris, New York City, Boston, and Mexico City. He composed original music for the film “The Burning Child” and received the ASCAP Plus Annual Award in 2017. Cheung co-organized a conference on “Dislocations: Reassessing Ligeti’s Many Worlds in the 21st Century” at the University of Chicago. He was the composer in residence of the Loretto Project with the Longleash Trio.

Martha Feldman, the Mabel Greene Myers Professor in Music and Romance Languages and Literature, served as President of the American Musicological Society.

Berthold Hoeckner, Professor and Chair in Music, received a grant from the John Templeton Foundation to develop the Chicago Center for Practical Wisdom.

Robert L. Kendrick, the William Colvin Professor in Music, was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Sam Pluta, Assistant Professor in Music, released two musical albums and performed worldwide, including in London, New York City, San Francisco, Berlin, and Amsterdam. Together with colleagues Berthold Hoeckner, and Augusta Read Thomas, he also received a grant from UChicago’s Women’s Board to build CHIME Studio B in the Department of Music, which will feature an analog modular synthesizer along with multichannel film and television mixing capabilities. The new space will accommodate more students studying electronic composition.

Marta Ptaszynska, Professor Emerita in Music, performed her music in the United States and Poland. She received commissions for compositions from the Ministry of Culture in Poland, Institute of Music in Poland, and the Fryderyk Chopin University of Music.

Steven Rings, Associate Professor in Music, was a scholar in residence at the Shanghai Conservatory in Shanghai, China and served as a series editor on Oxford Studies in Music Theory (Oxford University Press, 2017).

Augusta Read Thomas, University Professor in Music, performed her compositions worldwide and served as the distinguished guest composer at the Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival, Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University, University of New Mexico, Northern Illinois University, and Southern Illinois University. For the full year, she was the composer in residence at the Eugene Symphony Orchestra. Thomas published several compositions that included Sonorous Earth, Two Thoughts about the Piano, and Plea for Peace, and also released several CDs. Among many accolades, she was the winner of the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia’s McCollin Composer Competition and received commissions for new compositions from the Martha Graham Dance Company and the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival.

Lawrence Zbikowski, Professor in Music, published Foundations of Musical Grammar (Oxford University Press, 2017).

NEAR EASTERN LANGUAGES AND CIVILIZATIONS

Orit Bashkin, Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, published Impossible Exodus: Iraqi Jews in Israel (Stanford University Press, 2017). She also received a residential fellowship from the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

Fred M. Donner, Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, delivered the plenary address to the Islamic section at the German Oriental Society in Jena, Germany, and at the International Society for Arabic Papyrology in Berlin.

Ahmed El Shamsy, Associate Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, received a residential Senior Scholar Fellowship to support a research leave, awarded by the Islamic Legal Studies Program at the Harvard University Law School.

Petra M. Goedegebuure, Associate Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, delivered the keynote address “The Universal Packagers –ant- and –a-, and Split-Ergativity in the Anatolian Language” at the West Coast Indo-European Conference in Los Angeles.

Ghenwa Hayek, Assistant Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, organized the conference “Rethinking the Margins in Arabic Literary Studies” at UChicago, featuring the keynote and fifth Annual Farouk Moustafa Memorial Lecture on Modern Arabic Literature, “Measures of the Modern: Arabic Literature in the Shadow of Comparison.”

Janet H. Johnson, the Morton D. Hull Distinguished Service Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, received the Distinguished Service Award from the American Research Center in Egypt.

Franklin D. Lewis, Associate Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, served as President of the American Institute of Iranian Studies.

Nadine Moeller, Associate Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, received the University of Chicago’s Llewellyn John and Harriet Manchester Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. She received a research grant from the Humanities Without Walls Consortium.

James Osborne, Assistant Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, served as the Kershaw lecturer for the American Institute of Archaeology conferences in Bozeman, Montana, Las Vegas, Nevada, and Iowa City, Iowa. He delivered the A.K. Grayson Lecture on Assyrian History and Culture to the Canadian Society for Mesopotamian Studies in Toronto.

Susanne Paulus, Assistant Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, received a research leave fellowship from UChicago’s Franke Institute for Humanities.

Tahera Qutbuddin, Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, was named a Fellow of the Shiah Institute in London and Director of the Qutbi Jubilee Scholarship Program and its annual Taqreeb conference series in Mumbai, India.

Herve Reculeau, Assistant Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, received a research grant from the Humanities Without Walls Consortium.

Robert K. Ritner, Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, was elected to the Board of Governors at the American Research Center in Egypt.

David Schloen, Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, received research grants from the National Science Foundation, UChicago’s Neubauer Collegium, and Canada’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

Gil J. Stein, Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, published Preserving the Cultural Heritage of Afghanistan (Oriental Institute Publications, 2017). He received several research grants to be the principal investigator using remote sensing data to document archaeological sites in Afghanistan from the US Department of State and the US Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan.

John Wee, Assistant Professor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, published The Comparable Body: Analogy and Metaphor in Ancient Mesopotamian, Egyptian, and Greco-Roman Medicine (Brill, 2017).

PHILOSOPHY

Matthew Boyle, Professor in Philosophy, co-organized the “Action & Perception” Conference at UChicago.

Daniel Brudney, Professor in Philosophy, received a research leave grant from the National Institutes of Health, where he served as a visiting scholar.

Agnes Callard, Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Philosophy, published Aspiration: The Agency of Becoming (Oxford University Press, 2018). She delivered the Gertrude Bussey Lecture at Northwestern University, the Balter Distinguished Lecture at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, and the keynote speech at the Pennsylvania Circle of Ancient Philosophy Conference at Penn State.

James Conant, the Chester D. Tripp Professor in Philosophy, served as the lead editor for the book The Norton Anthology of Western Philosophy: After Kant, Volume 2: The Analytic Tradition (W. W. Norton & Company, 2017). He also received a five-year research grant through the Anneliese Maier Forschungspreis Award from the Humboldt Foundation and served as the co-director of the FAGI Institute for Analytic German Idealism at the University of Leipzig.

Arnold I. Davidson, the Robert O. Anderson Distinguished Service Professor in Philosophy, was named the first honor fellow for the Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Anti-Semitism at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Matthias Haase, Assistant Professor in Philosophy, received research grants from Alexander von Humbolt Stiftung at the Universität Leipzig, as well as UChicago’s Council on Advanced Studies and Franke Institute for Humanities..

Michael Kremer, the Mary R. Morton Professor and Chair in Philosophy, received a research leave fellowship from UChicago’s Franke Institute for Humanities.

Martha Nussbaum, the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor in Philosophy, Law, and Ethics, published The Monarchy of Fear (Simon & Schuster, 2018) and co-authored Aging Thoughtfully: Conversations about Retirement, Romance, Wrinkles, and Regrets ( Oxford University Press, 2017) with Saul Levmore. She also coedited Confronting Torture (University of Chicago Press, 2018) with Scott A. Anderson. Additionally, Nussbaum delivered the 2017 Jefferson Lecture for the National Endowment for the Humanities and received honorary degrees from Concordia University and Coopers Union and was the recipient of the Don M. Randel Award for Achievement in the Humanities from the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Thomas Pashby, Assistant Professor in Philosophy, was awarded the Benjamin Meaker Visiting Professorship at the Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Bristol.

Robert Pippin, the Evelyn Stefansson Nef Distinguished Service Professor in Philosophy, published The Philosophical Hitchcock: “Vertigo” and the Anxieties of Unknowingness (University of Chicago Press, 2017) as well as its Spanish translation and received the Penn State Alumni Lifetime Achievement Award. Pippin also delivered the Steiner Lecture at St. John’s College in Santa Fe, and the Kneller Lecture at the Philosophy of Education Society in Chicago.

Candace Vogler, the David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor in Philosophy, received a fellowship from Fullbright World Learning and the Hyde Park Institute. She also served as the Chair of the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues at the University of Birmingham, UK, and as a Faculty Fellow at the Royal Institute of Philosophy.

Malte Willer, Associate Professor in Philosophy, received funding from UChicago’s Neubauer Collegium to co-lead the initiative “An Organon for the Information Age: Ontology-Based Data Integration for Humanistic and Biomedical Research” with David Schloen and Samuel Volchenboum.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Frederick de Armas, the Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Service Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures and Comparative Literature, served as the Honorary President of the Early Modern Image and Text Society and Asociación Internacional Siglo de Oro. He also delivered the plenary talk, “Vanishing Architectures in Cervantes’ Persiles,” at the University of Norway and received an honorary doctorate from the University of Neuchâtel in Switzerland.

Daisy Delogu, Professor and Chair in Romance Languages and Literatures, received a grant from the UChicago Paris Center to study wartime poetry to prepare for an upcoming conference.

Philippe Desan, the Howard L. Willett Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures, coedited Scepticisme et pensée morale de Michel de Montaigne á Stanley Cavell  (Hermann, 2017) and Les Biographies littéraires: theories, pratiques, et perspectives nouvelles (Classiques Garnier, 2017) and edited Les Usages philosophiques de Montaigne du XVIe au XXIe siècle (Hermann, 2018).

Daniel Desormeaux, Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures, published Frédéric Marcelin, Thémistocle-Épaminondas Labasterre (Société des Textes Français Modernes, 2017) and coedited Les Biographies littéraires: theories, pratiques et perspectives nouvelles (Classiques Garnier, 2017).

Alison James, Associate Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures, received grants from the Division’s Humanities Council and the UChicago Center in Paris to research “writing the everyday in the 21st century” in preparation for an upcoming conference.

Agnes Lugo-Ortiz, Associate Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures, co-organized and received several grants for the “Colloquium on Slavery and Visual Culture” at the UChicago Center in Paris. She also received the Connie and David Coolidge Research Grant from the Division of the Humanities.

Armando Maggi, Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures, published Lucrezia Marinella’s two hagiographies on St. Francis of Assisi with University of Chicago graduate students.

Maria Anna Mariani, Assistant Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures, was recognized with the UChicago Bobbi Josephine Hernandez Sze A.M. 1993 and Morgan Chia Wen Sze M.B.A. 1993 Teaching Award.

Miguel Martínez, Associate Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures, received UChicago’s Neubauer Faculty Development Fellowship for excellence in undergraduate teaching.

Larry Norman, the Frank L. Sulzberger Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures, delivered the Keynote Address at UChicago’s Humanities Day 2017. He organized, chaired, and participated in the round table for the Conference “Théâtre et Scandale” at the Université Paris Sorbonne and the UChicago Center in Paris. Norman received a grant to develop a new interdisciplinary seminar with David Wray from the Center for Disciplinary Innovation at UChicago’s Franke Institute for Humanities.

Thomas Pavel, the Gordon J. Laing Distinguished Service Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures, was an invited scholar at the Mortimer and Raymond Sackler Institute of Advanced Studies at Tel Aviv University.

Justin Steinberg, Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures, published the Italian translation of Accounting for Dante (Viella, 2018). He also received research leave fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Council of Learned Societies.

SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Robert Bird, Professor in Slavic Languages and Literatures and Cinema and Media Studies, published Revolution Every Day: A Calendar (Mousse, 2018). He delivered the keynote address at the Energy Humanities East Conference in Berlin and organized “The Bolshevik Contagion” and “Philosophy of Revolution” at UChicago’s Neubauer Collegium. Bird also received a grant from UChicago’s Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry for a collaborative project with multimedia artist Cauleen Smith.

SOUTH ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CIVILIZATIONS

Thibaut d’Hubert, Assistant Professor in South Asian Languages and Civilizations, published In the Shade of the Golden Palace: Alaol and Middle Bengali Poetics in Arakan (Oxford University Press, 2018).

Ulrike Stark, Professor in South Asian Languages and Civilizations, delivered the keynote address at the conference “Script. Print, and Letterforms in Global Contexts” at the University of Birmingham, UK.

Tyler Williams, Associate Professor in South Asian Languages and Civilizations, published Text and Tradition in Early Modern North India (Oxford University Press, 2018). He also received a fellowship from the American Institute of Indian Studies and a travel grant from the UChicago Committee on South Asian Studies.

VISUAL ARTS

Geof Oppenheimer, Associate Professor of Practice in the Arts in Visual Arts, published The Hysterical Material (Soberscove Press and Smart Museum, 2017). He participated in the exhibitions Inquiry 01 at the Spertus Institute in Chicago; Declaration at the Institute for Contemporary Art VC in Richmond, Virginia; The Dangerous Professor at the Flatland Gallery in Houston; Brown People Are the Wrens in the Parking Lot (organized by his colleague Pope.L) at Logan Center; and Three Chapters in the New Cynicism at the Kadist Foundation in Paris.

William Pope.L, Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Visual Arts, had works presented in group exhibitions, including 20/20; Art on the Front Lines; River Assembly; We Are Here; Wanderlust: Actions, Traces, and Journeys 1967–2017; Flint Water, What Pipeline; Black Pulp!; If Not Apollo, the Breeze; Mechanisms; Active Ingredients: Prompts, Props, Performance; Brown People Are the Wrens in the Parking Lot; Net Art Anthology; Elements of Vogue; Against the Architecture; The Land We Live in — the Land We Left Behind; Counternarratives: Performance and Actions in Public Spaces; 30 Americans: The Rubell Family Collection; The Enemy of My Enemy; Walking Point; and Learning from the Land and the Water. He also received the Mellon Collaborative Fellowship for Arts Practice and Scholarship from UChicago’s Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry.

Jason Salavon, Associate Professor in Visual Arts, had a solo exhibition, Rainbow Aggregator, at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland and participated in the group exhibit In Real Time at the Carl and Marilynn Thoma Foundation Art House in Santa Fe. He also received grants to study the I-Corps program and the influence of algorithmic processes for art from the National Science Foundation and UChicago’s Neubauer Collegium. 

David Schutter, Associate Professor in Visual Arts, published Documenta 14: Daybook (Documenta and Prestel, 2017) and Reluctance to Reveal: A Conversation with David Schutter (Aurel Scheibler, 2017). He had a solo exhibition at the Rhona Hoffman Gallery in Chicago and participated in group exhibitions in Kassel, Ghent, Rome, and Amsterdam.

Jessica Stockholder, the Raymond W. and Martha Gruner Distinguished Service Professor and Chair in Visual Arts, published a revised and expanded version of Jessica Stockholder (Phaidon Press, 2017). She was honored by the Aldrich Museum of Connecticut and the Contemporary Austin Awards, as well as being elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Stockholder participated in a wide range of group exhibitions, which included places such as Hjalteyri, Iceland; the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.; Munich; and Vienna.

Catherine Sullivan, Associate Professor in Visual Arts, had her work displayed in a three-person exhibition, Falling for You, at the Triumph Gallery in Chicago. She also participated in group exhibitions such as The Dangerous Professors, Vision on Vision.