Alumni

Master Class: Graduate Students Discuss Teaching Methods with Peers

Arriving on campus before classes begin might seem like an activity limited to first-years. However, the 300 graduate students that headed to the Center for Teaching and Learning this past fall were in for their own kind of orientation--an intensive two-day instruction workshop to prepare them for teaching College courses. Students took part in large-scale discussions about classroom ethics and attended smaller group sessions devoted to topics ranging from teaching in the American classroom to the role of the teaching assistant.

A-J Aronstein, AM'10, Featured in 'Paris Review Daily'

It's a balmy 38 degrees today in Chicago, but an article by A-J Aronstein, AM'10, in the Paris Review Daily reminds us not to get too comfortable. Aronstein, an alumni of the Master of Arts Program in the Humanities (MAPH), meditates on how the unique cold of February in Chicago affects our bodies and brains, leading us from Lacan to Netflix and from selfish survival to the promise of OKCupid.

Valerie Snobeck, MFA’08, Creates Piece for Smart Museum Courtyard

Valerie Snobeck, MFA'08, has created a piece titled American Standard Movement as part of the annual Threshold series sponsored by the Smart Museum of Art. The site-specific work, presented in the Vera and A.D. Elden Sculpture Garden, re-uses debris netting that was previously part of a construction project on the University of Chicago campus in order to open up questions about environment, the passage of time, and progress.

Alumna Traces History of Bowl Belonging to Cleopatra Through 20th Century AD

Cultural historian Marina Belozerskaya, AM'92, PhD'97, has published the first book-length account of the Tazza Farnese, a libation bowl dating to Ptolemaic Egypt that once belonged to Cleopatra. The book, titled Medusa's Gaze: The Extraordinary Journey of the Tazza Farnese, charts the renowned artifact's journey through history, from Rome and Constantinople to the Holy Roman Emperor's court at Palermo and the French Revolution. It inspired artists such as Raphael and Botticelli and was owned by Greek, Roman, Byzantine, and Mongol rulers. The Tazza Farnese's adventure continued even after it came to rest at the Naples National Archaeological Museum--it was nearly destroyed there in 1925 by a deranged guard.

For more information on alumni publications, visit the University of Chicago Magazine, or check out the catalog of alumni books on the magazine's Goodreads page.

Pages